«Gamified learning activities with quizzes an AI storytelling to improve software engineering education»

Date

22-11-2019

Speaker

Rui Prada

Abstract

Quizzes can be used to improve educational activities in several ways. They are good motivational tools to keep students engaged in class, and are useful to illustrate gaps in the knowledge students may have. Quizzes may be used off-class as a study tool promoting active learning and self-regulation of learning. We have developed a tool to share and deliver quizzes to students to be used primarily in software engineering classes. To feed the tool we processed the data of 10 years of question and answering reports from a course on Software Architecture that is offered in the Master Program of Computer Science in the Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa. Furthermore, to improve the learning activities in the games promoted by the IMPRESS project we make use of the FAtiMA Toolkit to add intelligent characters in order to enrich the interaction experience with storytelling elements. Those characters can provide some support to the learners and also give a narrative flavor to the experience by putting the activities of the games in engaging contexts. 

Slides

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Video

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Author's Biography

Rui Prada  

Prof. Dr. Eng. Rui Prada is a Senior Researcher at GAIPS, INESC-ID and an Associate Professor at the Computer Science Department of Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa (IST), where he teaches courses on User Centred Design, Game Design and Development and Socially Intelligent Agents. He has a degree in Computer Science with a specialisation in Artificial Intelligence and a PhD in the same field, from IST. At GAIPS he develops his research interests in the fields of Social Intelligent Agents, Virtual Collaborative Environments, User Centred Design and Computer Games and has participated in fourteen National and EU research projects, coordinating two of them. He is author and co-author of more than 100 peer-reviewed scientific papers presented at international events and journals. 

«Learning formal specification should also be fun»

Date

22-11-2019

Speaker

Wishnu Prasetya

Abstract

There are many benefits in providing formal specifications for our software. However, teaching students to do this is not always easy as courses on formal methods are often experienced as dry by students. This talk will present a game called FormalZ that teachers can use to introduce some variation in their class. Students can have some fun in playing the game and, while doing so, also learn the basics of writing formal specifications. Unlike existing software engineering themed education games, FormalZ takes a rather radical approach, namely deep gamification where playing gets a more central role in order to generate more engagement. We will discuss the results of our field study with this game, what we learned from this study and our recommendation for future work. 

Slides

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Video

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Author's Biography

Wishnu Prasetya  

S.W.B. (Wishnu) Prasetya is researcher and lecturer at the Department of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University. His field of research is software testing and verification. actively conducts research in the field of software testing and verification. In the past ten years he has been lecturing in courses such as Modelling and System Development, Software Testing and Verification, ICT Entrepreneurship, and Software Project. He investigates ways to use computers to test software, so that the burden of manual work can be reduced and, hence producing better quality software while reducing the cost. He is also the author and maintainer of the tool T3, which is an automated random-based testing tool to test Java classes (https://git.science.uu.nl/prase101/t3/wikis/home).

 

«Gamifying a software testing course with the Code Defenders Testing Game»

Date

22-11-2019

Speaker

Gordon Fraser

Abstract

Software testing is an essential skill for software developers, but it is challenging to get students engaged in this activity. The Code Defenders game addresses this problem by letting students compete over code under test by either introducing faults («attacking») or by writing tests to reveal these faults («defending»). In this talk, we describe how we integrated Code Defenders as a semester-long activity of an undergraduate and graduate level university course on software testing. We complemented the regular course sessions with weekly Code Defenders sessions, addressing challenges such as selecting suitable code to test, managing games, and assessing performance. Our experience and our data show that the integration of Code Defenders was well-received by students and led them to practice testing thoroughly. Positive learning effects are evident as student performance improved steadily throughout the semester.

 

Slides

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Video

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Author's Biography

Gordon Fraser  

Gordon Fraser is a full professor in Computer Science at the University of Passau. He received his Ph.D. from Graz University of Technology, Austria, in 2007, then worked as a post-doc researcher at Saarland University, Germany, and as a (senior) lecturer at the University of Sheffield until 2017. He has published on improving software quality and programmer productivity at all major software engineering venues (e.g., TSE, TOSEM, ICSE, ISSTA, FSE, ASE, ICST) and has received six ACM SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Awards (FSE'14, ISSTA'14, ASE'14, ASE'15, ESEC/FSE'15, ICSE'17), as well as best paper awards at SSBSE and GECCO. He has been programme chair of software engineering conferences (ASE, ICST, TAP, TAIC PART, SSBSE) and workshops, is a regular member of many programme and organising committees in the field (e.g., ICSE, FSE, ASE, ISSTA), is associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering (TSE) and Software Testing, Verification, and Reliability (STVR) journals.

 

«The IMPRESS project goals: improving the quality of software through games and gamification in educational programs»

Date

22-11-2019

Speaker

Iván Martínez Ortiz 

Abstract

Today, people and society depend increasingly on software quality. Software determines many aspects of our daily lives, including our social and business activities. That's why the demands on software quality are growing. Software security has gone from being a good practice to becoming a real necessity. But what really happens in practice? Is educational technology answering these demands properly? The answer is «no», at least «not as it should be».

The eMadrid project includes the use of serious games, gamification and learning analytics to improve education and collaborates with the Erasmus+ IMPRESS european project, designed to enhance this situation by introducing game elements into educational software engineering programs.

Slides

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Video

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Author's Biography

Iván Martínez Ortiz  

Iván Martínez Ortiz is a professor in the Department of Software Engineering and Artificial Intelligence of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), where he develops teaching and research activities. His research interests are focused on educational innovation through new technologies, with special attention to educational modeling languages, specific domain languages applied to education and the use of video games and other interactive materials for educational purposes and learning analytics. He has published more than 50 articles on this subject. Dr. Martínez Ortiz is also a member of AENOR's Technical Committee for e-Learning Standardization (CTN71/SC36).

On the identification of several key issues on OER Discovery for Smart Learning Environments

Date

02-12-2019

Speakers

P. Molins, F. Jurado, P. Rodríguez. Universidad Autónoma.

Abstract

The best Open Educational Resources (OER) for each final user can be hard to find. OER come from lots of sources, in many different formats, conforming to a diverse logical structure and each user may present different objectives depending on their role in the teaching/learning process and their context. Previous attempts have only focused on one kind of technologies. A new approach that embraces diversity, may gain from the potential synergies of sharing resources in the development of the final recommendation system and the exploitation of the data. In this work, we aim at identifying the main challenges facing the field of OER recommendation, for a potential architecture model.

Slides

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